TEACHING

 

This course is designed for graduate students with a strong engineering background that want to learn more about the physical and mathematical principles behind experimentation. It will include the fundamentals of optics, optical interferometry, and imaging systems including Digital Volume Correlation and Particle Image Velocimetry. It will also include signal processing, and spatial and temporal filtering techniques. The goal of the course is to give students a quantitative appreciations of commonly used experimental methods in mechanics, their applications, limitations and theories. Students will be able to apply the theories learned in lectures to carefully designed laboratory experiments. As such the course is intended for all students with interests in continuum mechanics.

ME 570: Experimental Mechanics (Spring 2019)

 

This course is designed to introduce graduate students to various topics within solid mechanics. It's important to note that this course serves primarily as a overview course rather than an in-depth course on the various subject areas, which include: Continuum Mechanics, Boundary Value Problems in Linear Elasticity, Stress Waves, Linear Viscoelasticity, Plasticity, and an introduction to Large-Deformation Elasticity. 

Mechanics of Solids

 

Mechanical behavior of materials and analysis of stress and deformation in engineering structures and continuous media. Topics include concepts of stress and strain; the elastic, plastic, and time-dependent response of materials; principles of structural analysis and application to simple bar structures, beam theory, instability and buckling, torsion of shafts; general three-dimensional states of stress; Mohr's circle; stress concentrations. Lectures, recitations, and laboratory.

Mechanics of Solids and Structures

 

This course is designed for junior and senior undergraduate students with an engineering background that want to learn more about the exciting field of biomechanics and its mathematical and mechanical descriptions of the human body and anatomy. It will include mechanics-based descriptions of muscles, bones, the circulatory system, and biological material properties commonly found throughout the human body. The course will present examples from recent theoretical and experimental research investigations, and teach quantitative tools commonly used by engineers in the field.

Biomechanics

 

Designed for students with a strong engineering background who want to learn more about the mathematical and mechanical descriptions of the cell and its functions. It will include an overview of cell biology emphasizing locomotion, mitosis (cell division), intracellular transport, cellular mechanotransduction, and biological material properties. The course will draw examples from recent theoretical and experimental research investigations, and teach quantitative tools commonly used by engineers in the field.

Cell Mechanics